Volgenau School of Engineering

The Volgenau School of Engineering  is a large, multidisciplinary school maintains a dual pre-eminence in both information technology and engineering.

The Volgenau School of Engineering was founded in 1985 as George Mason University’s School of Information Technology and Engineering.

Through teaching, research, and practice, Mason Engineering seeks to graduate students who will take initiative, step up, and leave the planet better than they found it.

Kenneth Ball

Dean, Volgenau School of Engineering, George Mason University

Kenneth Ball was appointed Dean of the Volgenau School of Engineering in August 2012.

He is recognized internationally for his research in computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer. He has chaired three international conferences, is a past associate technical editor of the ASME Journal of Heat Transfer, and has served on several other engineering journal editorial boards. He is very involved in engineering program assessment and accreditation activities, both in the U.S. and internationally, particularly in the Middle East.

Elise Miller-Hooks

Professor, Bill & Eleanor Hazel Chair in Infrastructure Engineering, Volgenau School of Engineering, George Mason University

Research:

Multi-Hazard Civil Infrastructure Resilience Quantification; Interdependent Infrastructure Lifelines Modeling; Disaster Planning, Evacuation and Response; Stochastic and Dynamic Network Algorithms; Intermodal Passenger and Freight Transport; Alternative Modes; Real-Time Routing and Fleet Management; Incident Management; Transportation Infrastructure Investment for Climate Uncertainty

Professional service:

Chair of the TRB Transportation Network Modeling Committee; Associate Editor, Transportation Science; Editorial Board Member, Transportation Research Part B and Journal of Intelligent Transportation Systems

Center for Transportation Public-Private Partnership Policy

The Center for Transportation Public-Private Partnership Policy (TP3 Policy Center) mission is to advance research, education and public service in the understanding of public-private partnership policy in the transportation sector.

Jonathan L. Gifford

Professor, Schar School of Policy and Government at George Mason University
Director, Center for Transportation Public-Private Partnership Policy

Center for Air Transportation Systems Research

The Center for Air Transportation Systems Research (CATSR) mission is to foster excellence in education and research in Air Transportation System Engineering.

Director, Lance Sherry

Contributions to the field include:

Transportation network-of-networks simulation, optimization, and analysis
Complex adaptive systems simulation and analysis
NNAS, airport and airspace simulation and performance analysis
Rare-event safety analysis for systems and devices
Aviation environment (noise and emissions)
Strategic planning and forecasting/industrial sector economics
Auctions and other allocation schemes
Portfolio analysis/costs-benefits analysis
Flightdeck design and human factors

Lance Sherry

Associate Professor, Systems Engineering and Operations Research department,  Volgenau School of Engineering at George Mason University
Director, Center for Air Transportation Systems Research (CATSR)

Dr. Sherry’s has pioneered research in data analytics and stochastic simulation of large complex adaptive systems such as the air transportation system, operations of airports, airlines and air traffic control, as well other network-of-network systems. These analyses are used widely for strategic planning, business development, cost/benefit analysis, and system productivity improvement.

Dr. Sherry has also conducted award wining work in human-computer interaction, operator training, and the design of autonomous and semi-autonomous systems (such as Unmanned Air Vehicles).

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